Panlibus Blog

What interests 250+ librarians at 8:30 on a Sunday morning

IMG_0165 Linked Data, that’s what! 

I must admit I was a little skeptical of the timing when I accepted the invitation to provide the keynote for a Linked Data session – on the last day of IFLA 2010 – at 8:30 in the morning – in August – on a Sunday.  Who was going to want to get up at that time, on the day they were probably going to leave beautiful Gothenburg, to hear me witter on about the Semantic Web and the obvious benefits of Linked Data for libraries? A few minutes before the start, I was beginning to think my skepticism was well founded, viewing the acres of empty seats laid out in their menacing ranks in front of me. But then almost as if from nowhere, the room rapidly filled and by the time I took the stage we had something approaching a full house.  As you can see from my iPhone snap below, we ended up with a significant group (I lost count at about 250) of interested librarians.

250+ Librarians in Gothenburg

So was it worth them turning up at such an unsociable time?  I obviously can’t speak for my session, but I believe it was well worth turning up.  We had a series talks which varied from the in-depth technical/ontological spectrum to the rousing plea to open up your data now – and don’t hamper it with too much licensing.

First on after my session was Gordon Dunsire from the University of Strathclyde who gave us some in depth reasoning as to why we needed complex detailed ontologies based upon standards like RDA, FRBR, FRAD, and RDA to describe library resources in RDF for the Semantic Web.   To represent the full detail that catalogers have, and want to, provide for resource description I agree with him.  I also believe that we need to temper that detailed view by including more generic ontologies in addition. People from outside of the library world, dipping into library data [with more ways to describe a title than there are flavors of ice cream], will back off and not link to it unless the can find a nice friendly dc:title or foaf:name that they understand.

Some of the other speakers that I caught included Patrick Danowski’s entertaining presentation entitled “Step 1: Blow up the silo!. He took us through the possible licenses to use for sharing data, only to conclude that the best approach was totally open public domain.  He then went on to recommend CC0 and/or PDDL as the best way to indicate that your data is open for anyone to do anything with.

Jan Hanneman from the German National Library delivered an interesting description [pdf]of the way they have been publishing their authority data as Linked Data, and the challenges they met on the way.  These included legal and licensing issues, around what and under what terms they could publish.  Scalability of their service, being another key issue once they move beyond authority data.

All in all it was an excellent Sunday morning in Gothenburg.  I presume the organizers of IFLA 2011 will take note of the interest and build a larger, more convenient, slot in the programme for Linked Data.

Note: My presentation slides can be viewed on Slideshare and downloaded in pdf form

4 Responses

  1. Alan Poulter Says:

    Any chance of reposting your presentation to Slideshare as the PDF download version seems to be corrupt? The timing of the event was appalling: IMO it was the most important IFLA event I have ever been to and I got there late after packing in a hurry and had to dash out at the end to catch a train to Copenhagen.

    Alan P.

  2. Richard Wallis Says:

    Alan, I have posted a link to the full pdf download – let me know if you can download it OK.

    Sorry you couldn’t catch all of the session.

  3. James@ document scanning Says:

    Good article, its good that more and more libraries and archives are digitising their books and documents, the benefits like full text search are bringing rapid information retrieval to the masses.

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